Mama mum

mama mum

altered form, a continuation of Middle English mome (“mother, aunt”), from Proto-Germanic *mōmǭ (“mother, aunt”), from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂- méh₂, reduplication of *méh₂- (“mother”), related to German Muhme (“aunt”), Latin mamma (“mother, nurse”), Irish mam (“mother”), Lithuanian mama, moma (“ mother”). 7 Apr We have several informal words for “mother” in English: mum (heard in much of England), mom (heard in much of America), and mam (heard in Ireland and Northern England). But are these actually different words, or are they just, in some sense, the same word? Although “mum,” “mam,” and “mom” read. 10 Apr This topic is something near and dear to my heart. It's something I talk about almost every day with intended parents and parents via egg donation from all over the globe – and they all have the very same question regarding their journey through egg donation: “Who's really my child's mother? It's me right?.

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Mama mum mom mommy mother 10 Apr This topic is something near and dear to my heart. It's something I talk about almost every day with intended parents and parents via egg donation from all over the globe – and they all have the very same question regarding their journey through egg donation: “Who's really my child's mother? It's me right?. 12 Feb One word in particular that stands out in English dialects is the word we use for our mothers. The British typically use “mum,” and the Americans, “mom”. But, why is there such a difference in spelling and pronunciation in different parts of the world?. altered form, a continuation of Middle English mome (“mother, aunt”), from Proto-Germanic *mōmǭ (“mother, aunt”), from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂- méh₂, reduplication of *méh₂- (“mother”), related to German Muhme (“aunt”), Latin mamma (“mother, nurse”), Irish mam (“mother”), Lithuanian mama, moma (“ mother”). mama mum

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